Monthly Archives: March 2012

Romeo and Juliet (the movie)

Zoom, Zoom. Zeffirelli’s film-take on Romeo and Juliet was overall very well done.  From the cinematography to the musical score, the drama of the story was definitely conveyed to the viewer, thanks to the director.  One entertaining, though risky aspect of the film … Continue reading

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Romeo and Juliet (Play)

Two households in Verona: Why doth thou fightest so? Unrevealed was the tragedy T’would strike, ay, thou did not know. “O, teach me how I should forget to think,” Said the venting Romeo to Benvolio. If only not of Rosaline, … Continue reading

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Shakespeare’s As You Like It

In comparison to Othello, Shakespeare turns this outcome around: “As You Like It” is not death-filled, In fact, it even has a clown. The marriages within Are verily a joy. The audience get characters Of lovers testing, coy. Then Rosalind, … Continue reading

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Shakespeare’s Othello

Unpredictable Drama Amongst Assumed Friends The thing that strikes me most about the tragedy Othello, as does nearly every other tragedy, is how the friendships turn to rotten relationships.  Perhaps this observation seems simple, but its idea (at least when taken to … Continue reading

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John Donne’s Poetry

Expressed Admiration What love John spake of for Two unfortunate parents’ daughter. Elizabeth was her name. Great acknowledgement of what she did Was present within his words For death had not too taken her fame. —————————————————————————- “For since death will … Continue reading

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Rachmaninoff’s All Night Vigil

“Bless the Lord, O My Soul” Hearing Rachmaninoff’s version of this song opened yet another door to my sense of musical pleasure.  The first time I heard this song’s melody (a 19th century chant–possibly earlier, according to Vlad) was in Kedrov’s arrangement, that has Protestant-sounding … Continue reading

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The Philokalia – I and II Centuries on Love

The Intellect What a loaded word, “intellect.”  Seldom had I heard this particular word, though its root, intell, is all too common in the English language.  St. Maximos conveys the significance of the intellect within his teachings on love by repeating … Continue reading

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