Monthly Archives: October 2011

Paradise I

Beauty and Ascent To rise is the new way.  To rise to the new Way is Dante’s aim.  Whereas in purgatory he struggled to climb the mountain of “negative” altitude (negative—based off of the diagram in class with this mountain … Continue reading

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Harkins – Week 8

My Stance on Stanley’s Messages Having been newly exposed to the finely-filtered fountain of Stanley Fish’s knowledge in his book How to Write a Sentence during the past two months, I have definitely profited.  Much appreciated is Fish’s concise style of condensing … Continue reading

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Purgatory II

Confusion and Curiosity What does the passage mean on page 265 of Dante’s Purgatory, “Blessed are they whom grace grants so much light, / that in their hearts the overhot desires,” / said he, “send up no smoke for taste’s … Continue reading

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Dante’s Purgatory I

Dante Seeks to Save The question, “Why does Dante seem to be the only human who gets to tour hell?” was once brought up in class.  Although this question was asked in context of Dante as the character, I am … Continue reading

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Inferno II

Not a Chance in Hell Wouldn’t it be frustrating for important things to very seldom be accomplished?  Consider the passage, “Yesterday, five hours later than this hour, one thousand and two hundred sixty-six years were completed since the road collapsed” … Continue reading

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HARKINS – WEEK 6

  Becoming a Fisher of Subordinating Style Fish revealed that there are three components of subordinating style: Causal (one event caused by another), Temporality (events are prior to another), and Precedence (events are ordered in hierarchies of importance).  An abundance … Continue reading

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Inferno I

More Then Than Now?! What does the above title mean? To put it in context, examine this passage from page 63 of Dante’s Inferno: Dante’s teacher, Virgil, says to him, “For all that these accursed folk cannot come to their … Continue reading

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